Question: Where Did The Term Second Fiddle Come From?

What does the term second fiddle mean?

Second fiddle is a role played by an assistant or second-in-command to someone else.

An example of second fiddle is the Vice President who serves under and assists the President.

YourDictionary definition and usage example..

Where did the word idiom come from?

The word Idiom’ is derived from French ‘idiome’ or Latin ‘idioma’ from Greek ‘idioma-matos’=private property, idos=own or private. Idioms originate and develop without the knowledge of speakers of a language. Sometimes without knowing we speak idiomatically.

What does the idiom down in the mouth mean?

informal. to be sad. Feeling sad and unhappy. a dog’s life idiom.

Why do we say put two and two together?

Put two and two together It doesn’t take a mathematical whiz to know that 2 + 2 = 4 and that’s indeed the heart of this expression. To put two and two together is used to mean ‘draw an obvious conclusion from what is known or evident’.

Why do they call a violin a fiddle?

A violin is sometimes informally called a fiddle, regardless of the kind of music being played with it. The words “violin” and “fiddle” come from the same Latin root, but “violin” came through the romance languages and “fiddle” through the Germanic languages.

Where did the term fit as a fiddle come from?

The phrase fit as a fiddle dates back to the 1600s in British English, but had a slightly different meaning then. The word fit had as its primary meaning ‘well-suited, apt for a particular purpose’.

Can you play a violin like a fiddle?

The answer is a surprising “no.” A violin and a fiddle are the same four-stringed instrument, generally played with a bow, strummed, or plucked. They are identical in their physical appearance. What distinguishes a violin from a fiddle is the style of music that is played on the instrument; it’s all in how you play it.

Is a violin also called a fiddle?

A fiddle is a bowed string musical instrument, most often a violin. It is a colloquial term for the violin, used by players in all genres including classical music. … The fiddle is part of many traditional (folk) styles, which are typically aural traditions—taught ‘by ear’ rather than via written music.

What is the meaning of two by two?

Adverb. (not comparable) in pairs, especially one of each sex.

What is another way to say put together?

Alternate Synonyms for “put together”: assemble; piece; set up; tack; tack together; join; bring together; make; create.

Why do we say Bob’s your uncle?

In 1887, British Prime Minister Robert Gascoyne-Cecil appointed his nephew Arthur James Balfour as Minister for Ireland. The phrase ‘Bob’s your uncle’ was coined when Arthur referred to the Prime Minister as ‘Uncle Bob’. Apparently, it’s very simple to become a minister when Bob’s your uncle!

What does Heavens to Betsy mean?

Q From Mark Lord: I am looking for the origin and meaning of the phrase Heavens to Betsy. A The meaning is simple enough: it’s a mild American exclamation of shock or surprise. It’s dated, only rarely encountered in print and then most often as an evocation of times past.

What does fell swoop mean?

Also at one fell swoop. All at once, in a single action, as in This law has lifted all the controls on cable TV in one fell swoop. This term was used and probably invented by Shakespeare in Macbeth (4:3), where the playwright likens the murder of Macduff’s wife and children to a hawk swooping down on defenseless prey.

What is the meaning of the idiom fit as a fiddle?

In excellent form or health. For example, He’s not just recovered, he’s fit as a fiddle. The original allusion of this simile has been lost. Its survival is probably due to the pleasant sound of its alliteration. [

Where does the expression dead as a doornail come from?

The term dead as a doornail was used in the 1500s by William Shakespeare, and in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol in 1843. It is thought that the phrase dead as a doornail comes from the manner of securing doornails that were hammered into a door by clenching them.

What is the difference between fiddles and violins?

“Fiddle” is often used for musical styles that lean in the folk direction: styles like bluegrass, cajun, country, and some types of traditional Celtic music. “Violin,” on the other hand, is typically used for Western classical music and jazz.

What is the meaning of at sixes and sevens?

“At sixes and sevens” is an English idiom used to describe a condition of confusion or disarray.

What does when pigs fly mean?

“When pigs fly” is an adynaton, a way of saying that something will never happen. The phrase is often used for humorous effect, to scoff at over-ambition.

Which language has the most idioms?

English, hands down. << French is a close winner I think. It basic grammar isn't that hard, but it's the idioms that makes it such a challenge. >> — I would say French is a close second.

Where did raining cats and dogs originated?

“Cats and dogs” may come from the Greek expression cata doxa, which means “contrary to experience or belief.” If it is raining cats and dogs, it is raining unusually or unbelievably hard. “Cats and dogs” may be a perversion of the now obsolete word catadupe. In old English, catadupe meant a cataract or waterfall.

What does the idiom don’t cry over spilled milk mean?

The Meaning of the ‘Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk’ Idiom No matter how you say the proverb, “don’t cry over spilled milk” or “it’s no use crying over spilled milk,” the phrase means that there’s no point to being upset over something that has already happened and cannot be changed.

Is it fell swoop or foul swoop?

In fact the phrase does have some connection to birds – but both “one fowl swoop” and “one foul swoop” are incorrect. The original phrase is actually “one fell swoop”. The phrase is an old one. It may have been coined by Shakespeare in 1605, or he may merely have popularised it.

Where did sleep like a baby come from?

After Bob Dole was defeated in the presidential campaign of 1996, he famously said, “I slept like a baby. I woke up every three hours and cried.” While babies don’t sleep deeply, they do sleep peacefully and untroubled, something we all wish for.

Where does bite the bullet come from?

To “bite the bullet” is to endure a painful or otherwise unpleasant situation that is seen as unavoidable. The phrase was first recorded by Rudyard Kipling in his 1891 novel The Light that Failed.

Where did cute as a button come from?

Pretty or attractive in a dainty way, as in That baby is cute as a button. Cute originally was a shortening of acute, for “sharp-witted and clever,” but in the early 1800s it also took on its current meaning. Other than that buttons and bug’s hearing organs can be small, there is no good explanation for these similes.

Where did the saying clean as a whistle come from?

[his] head taken off as clean as a whistle.” The expression is proverbial, at least since the 18th century, when Robert Burns used a variation on it. More likely the basic idea suggests the clear, pure sound a whistle makes, or the slippery smooth surface of a willow stick debarked to make a whistle.